Teatime Word Games

Created for quiet teatimes at home or as party activities.

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Tudor Storrs Jenks (1857-1922) was an American journalist, poet, author of many books and artist. One of the dozens of poems published in his lifetime is this one that seems to perfectly describe an evening “playroom” teatime between father and daughter. Originally published in An American Anthology, 1787-1900.  Houghton Mifflin, Boston

 

Small and Early

by Tudor Jenks

 

When Dorothy and I took tea, we sat upon the floor;

No matter how much tea I drank, she always gave me more;

Our table was the scarlet box in which her tea-set came;

Our guests, an armless one-eyed doll, a wooden horse gone lame.

She poured out nothing, very fast, — the teapot tipped on high,

And in the bowl found sugar lumps unseen by my dull eye.

She added rich (pretended) cream — it seemed a willful waste,

For though she overflowed the cup, it did not change the taste.

She asked, “Take milk?” or “Sugar?” and though I answered, “No,”

She put them in, and told me that I “must take it so!”

She’d say “Another cup, Papa?” and I, “No, thank you, Ma’am,”

But then I had to take it — her courtesy was sham.

Still, being neither green, nor black, nor English-breakfast tea,

It did not give her guests the “nerves” — whatever those may be.

Though often I upset my cup, she only minded when

I would mistake the empty cups for those she’d filled again.

She tasted my cup gingerly, for fear I’d burn my tongue;

Indeed, she really hurt my pride — she made me feel so young.

I must have drunk some two score cups, and Dorothy sixteen,

Allowing only needful time to pour them, in between.

We stirred with massive pewter spoons, and sipped in courtly ease,

With all the ceremony of the stately Japanese.

At length she put the cups away. “Goodnight, Papa,” she said;

And I went to a real tea, and Dorothy to bed.


The following is taken from the Wikipedia page: Tudor Jenks

Tudor Storrs Jenks (May 7, 1857 – February 11, 1922) was an American authorpoetartist and editor, as well as a journalist and lawyer. He is chiefly remembered for the popular works of fiction and nonfiction he wrote for children and general readers.

Tudor Jenks

Image from Wikipedia

Complete Bibliography From Wikipedia

To better appreciate this little poem and the poet, we are sharing the bibliography of his work as listed on Wikipedia.

Juvenile fiction

  • The Century World’s fair book for boys and girls; being the adventures of Harry and Philip with their tutor, Mr. Douglass, at the World’s Columbian Exposition (1893) (Internet Archive e-text)
  • Imaginotions; Truthless Tales (1894) (Google e-text) (Internet Archive e-text)
  • Galopoff, the Talking Pony; a story for young folks (1901)
  • Gypsy the Talking Dog; a story for young folks (1902)
  • The Defense of the Castle, a story of the siege of an English castle in the thirteenth century (1903) (Google e-text) (Internet Archive e-text)
  • Making a Start (1903)
  • A Little Rough Rider (1904)
  • The Doll That Talked (1906)
  • The Astrologer’s Niece (1973)

Magic Wand series

What Shall I Be? series

  • The Fireman (1911)
  • The Sailor (1911)

Short stories

  • “Prehistoric Photography”
  • “The Tongaloo Tournament”
  • “The Dragon’s Story”
  • “A Duel in a Desert”
  • “The Sequel”
  • “A Lost Opportunity” (1894)
  • “The Astrologer’s Niece”
  • “The Astrologer’s Niece Marries”
  • “The Winning of Vanella”
  • “The Professor and the Patagonian Giant”
  • “The Prince’s Councilors”
  • “Teddy and the Wolf”
  • “Little Plunkett’s Cousin”
  • “Professor Chipmunk’s Surprising Adventure”
  • “The Satchel”
  • “Good Neighbors”
  • “Anthony and the Ancients”
  • “A Yarn of Sailor Ben’s”
  • “The Statue”
  • “The Department of Athletics” (1894)
  • “A Literary Conversation” (1898)
  • “A Novel Ruined” (1899)
  • “A Supernatural Swindle” (1899)
  • “At the Door” (1899)
  • “The Umbrella of Justice” (1901)
  • “The Detective and the Ring” (1905)
  • “The Master Passion” (1905)
  • “A Concrete Example” (1905)
  • “Why Duillius Dined at Home” (1909)
  • “A Practical Problem” (1921)

Drama

  • “Quits: a Dialogue Farce in Two Scenes” (1893)
  • “Abbie’s Accounts: a Monologue” (1897)
  • “The Baron’s Victim: A Mellow Drama” (with Duffield Osborne) (1898)
  • “Diplomatic Reserve: a Dialogue” (1898)
  • “Parried” (1899)
  • “At the Door: a Little Comedy” (1899)
  • “Waiting for the Ring: a Monologue” (1902)
  • “The Lady and the Telephone” (1904)
  • Dinner at Seven Sharp; a comedy in one act (1917) (with Amabel Jenks) (Google e-text)

Poetry

  • “Bric-a-Brac” (1888)
  • “A Thank-ye-Ma’am (To J.W.R.)” (1889)
  • “A Reader’s Choice” (1890)
  • “How Curious! Said One Little Girl to Another Little Girl” (1894)
  • “A Christmas Song” (1895)
  • “Little Miss Pigeon” (1897)
  • “Punishment” (1897)
  • “Tidy Housekeeper” (1897)
  • “New Neighbor” (1898)
  • “King and Minstrel” (1899)
  • “Immortality” (1899)
  • “A Prayer” (1899)
  • “Two Valentines” (1900)
  • “Boast Fulfilled” (1900)
  • “On the Road” (1900)
  • “Pleased Customer” (1901)
  • “At Cupid’s Counter” (1901)
  • “Interchange” (1901)
  • “Queen’s Messenger” (1902)
  • “New Sentry and the Little Boy” (1902)
  • “A Merry-Go-Round” (1903)
  • “Little Elfin Nurse” (1903)
  • “Baby’s Name” (1903)
  • “A Creed” (1903)
  • “The Battlefield” (1904)
  • “A Feat of Memory” (1904)
  • “Eternal Feminine” (1904)
  • “Three Lessons” (1905)
  • “June” (1905)
  • “Pastoral” (1905)
  • “The Very Earliest” (1905)
  • “Three Lessons” (1905)
  • “Waiting for the Train” (1905)
  • “Stop Thief!” (1906)
  • “Sold” (1906)
  • “N. E. W. S.” (1906)
  • “Old Mammy Tipsytoes” (1906)
  • “Change of View” (1906)
  • “Modern Boy” (1906)
  • “Demon of Notre Dame” (1907)
  • “For Spellers” (1908)
  • “How We Say It” (1908)
  • “Months and the Jewels” (1909)
  • “The Rime of the Moderne Millionaire” (1909)
  • “Rien du Tout” (1910)
  • “Words Without Songs” (1910)
  • “Lucky Man” (1911)
  • “The Portrait and the Artist” (1912)
  • “Brave Little Girl” (1914)
  • “Little Supposing” (1914)
  • “After School” (1915)
  • “Portrait by Velasquez” (1916)
  • “Here’s How!” (1916)
  • “Short Flight” (1916)
  • “In Italy” (1917)
  • “Way to the Fairies” (1917)
  • “A Timely Petition” (1917)
  • “The Song of the Collar-Button” (1917)
  • “Aquarellist Vision” (1918)
  • “Fairyland Fashions” (1919)
  • “A Summing Up” (1919)
  • “Words Without Songs” (1910)
  • “Small and Early”
  • “The Spirit of the Maine”
  • “In a Library”
  • “An Old Bachelor”

Nonfiction

Biography

Lives of Great Writers
Other

History

  • The Book of Famous Sieges (1909) (Google e-text) (Internet Archive e-text)
  • The Boys’ Book of Explorations; true stories of the heroes of travel and discovery in Africa, Asia, Australia and the Americas. From the “Dark Ages” to the “wonderful century” (1900) (Internet Archive e-text)
  • Our army for our boys; a brief story of its organization, development and equipment from 1775 to the present day (1906)
  • When America Was New (1907) (Internet Archive e-text)
  • When America Won Liberty: Patriots and Royalists (1909) (Google e-text)
  • When America Became a Nation (1910)

Science

Short works

  • “The Essay” (1893)
  • “Scraps” (1894)
  • “A Miniature Reference Library” (1894)
  • “Intercivic Humor” (1899)
  • “A Brief for the Philistine” (1906)
  • “The Best Books for Children” (1901)
  • “Can the Jury System Be Improved?” (1903)
  • “The ‘American’ Characteristics” (1905)

Edited